What To Consider When Filing Personal Bankruptcy

In the times of this less than stellar economy, more and more people are finding out what it means to be bankrupt. People who have worked all their lives to support themselves and their families have become surrounded by debt and lose all hope. Personal bankruptcy can be scary, but you can escape it, as you will see by reading the following article.

Get a plan in place for after your bankruptcy is over. Your debt will be forgiven, but you have to find a way to make sure that your financial picture will recover. Set definite goals so that you are always working toward a financial future that will never get you in this position again.



A critical tip in filing personal bankruptcy is to steer clear of making payments to creditors, in advance of filing a petition, in an attempt to satisfy individual debts in full outside of bankruptcy court. Payments to family members and creditors made within defined periods of time prior to a bankruptcy filing can be voided and can jeopardize the chances of receiving a discharge of all debts in the case.

Make sure that you know which,or your assets you will lose when you declare yourself bankrupt. While filing for bankruptcy may seem like a great way to clear the slate and start again with your finances, you need to understand that most of your assets will be seized during the process.

An important tip regarding personal bankruptcy is, gaining an understanding of what sorts of debts can, and cannot be included in a discharge. By realizing that some obligations are not considered dischargeable under the bankruptcy code, it is possible to make a wiser, more informed choice when it comes to making the decision to file a petition.

If you have filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, but realize that you are unable to meet your payment obligations, you may be able to convert to a Chapter 7 bankruptcy instead. To qualify for the conversion, you must never have converted your bankruptcy before and also undergo a financial evaluation. The laws surrounding this process are always changing, so be sure to talk with an attorney who can help you navigate this process.

Be prepared to see your name in the news when you file bankruptcy. While the story isn't going to make front-page headlines unless you are a very prominent or famous figure, all bankruptcy cases are public record. As such, they are often reported in a section of local newspapers. Click That Link is that not everyone reads that part.

Locate an online support forum for those who have filed for bankruptcy. This way, you can ask other people questions and find out things that you may not know. There are a lot of forums on the internet, but there are also, some offline groups you can join, if you prefer being offline. Because these people know what you're going through, they can make you feel better about the situation.

Before you consider filing for bankruptcy, you should make a pre-determination if bankruptcy may be the right choice. First, make a list of all income, including, salary, child support, alimony, rent and any other sources you may have. Then, make a list of your bills. These would include mortgage, rent, car payments, monthly credit card payments, groceries and gas. If your monthly bill total is more than the income you bring in, it may be time to seek the advice of a bankruptcy attorney, who can help you make the final decision.

Never use a paralegal to guide you through the bankruptcy process. While some paralegals may have the necessary knowledge to provide all the answers you need, they cannot give legal advice legally. Because of this, you are not guaranteed in any way to receive accurate information or advice. An attorney, on the other hand, has a legal and ethical obligation to provide you with accurate information and sound advice.

Before meeting with an attorney about your personal bankruptcy, get your paperwork in order and have it available. The attorney will need to see all of this documentation to help you move forward. Don't be selective in what you bring! Every document you have that shows finances, assets, debts and credit will need to be considered.

Start taking calls from bill collectors. You may have been avoiding calls from bill collectors, but if you are filing bankruptcy you may need to speak to them. You need to have all of your debts laid out so that your lawyer can get to work involving them in your case. If you don't include a debt, it will not be discharged, and you will still have to pay it.

Don't make the mistake of hesitating to file for bankruptcy because you think you won't be able to file again and may need to save it for a worse financial situation. The laws vary from state to state, but you may file again after a certain period, usually two to eight years, depending on the type of bankruptcy filed. Of course, you won't want to file again, but in case of job loss or a major illness, the opportunity is there if you need it.

See what the value is on your home. If you are upside down on your mortgage, you may be able to eliminate your second mortgage. The main guideline for this is that your home must be worth more than what you owe on the first mortgage. This could really help your financial situation by relieving you from that large second mortgage payment each month.

If you want to try to avoid bankruptcy, you have to do everything you can to reduce your expenses. Sit down and write-up every expense you have for the month and start slashing. It does not matter how small, even the buck you spend at the coffee machine helps and adds up.

If you are avoiding personal bankruptcy but fear that you will lose your retirement savings, you should know that is not likely to happen. If you have an ERISA qualified retirement program (most are), then your retirement savings are safe from claims by creditors. This applies to funds in 401ks and to most IRAs. Consult your own bankruptcy attorney for specific details for your circumstances, but you should know the odds are in your favor.

Continue to pay certain bills. Once browse around this site file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you won't receive any more collection calls, and you may cease to receive certain bills. Remember that you are still under obligation to pay for your 'secured possessions', such as your home or vehicle, or you may lose them.


Although filing for bankruptcy is a personal issue with individual circumstances, you are not alone in your troubles. Millions are turning to bankruptcy to alleviate unbearable financial pressure, and open their financial future. Hopefully, this article helped you see through this process and toward a more prosperous and less stressful tomorrow.

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